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The Frame Weekend: Bryan Cranston; Last Black Man In San Fran; Sex In Movies




Bryan Cranston stars in the Broadway production of
Bryan Cranston stars in the Broadway production of "Network."
Jan Versweyveld

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BRYAN CRANSTON MAKES A CASE FOR ANGER (AND WINS A TONY)

Bryan Cranston wins a Tony for playing the "mad as Hell" TV news anchor, Howard Beale, in the stage adaptation of the movie "Network."

THE INGENIOUS PLAYWRIGHT LUCAS HNATH

Lucas Hnath is one of the hottest playwrights working in the American theater these days. He has a high profile show on Broadway now called "Hillary and Clinton" starring Laurie Metcalf and John Lithgow. Hnath has also just opened a very personal play in Los Angeles. It's called "Dana H." and it's up now at the Kirk Douglas Theatre. It tells the true story of how his mother was kidnapped when he was in college. He tells John Horn about the innovative way he approached he used with an actress lip-synching to audio recordings of his mother.

TOP FILM CRITIC WANTS MORE SEX IN MOVIES

Film critic Ann Hornaday argues for Hollywood studios to bring back the sex scenes of the '70's and '80's in her Washington Post article, "Sex is disappearing from the big screen, and it’s making movies less pleasurable." 

MEET THE BAND 'MAKING MOVIES'

The Kansas City-based Latin rock band, Making Movies, was little known until singer Rubén Blades invited them to record a song with him. The quartet is currently on tour across the country and The Frame contributor Betto Arcos got a chance to talk with the members during their stop in Los Angeles.

THE FRAME OF "FRAMING JOHN DELOREAN" 

The story of John DeLorean should have been made into a movie years ago. He was an engineering maverick with General Motors, credited with inventing the muscle car. He was featured in magazines, he dated supermodels, and even had plastic surgery to enlarge his chin. He later founded the DeLorean Motor Company, which was made famous through the "Back To The Future" car. DeLorean then lost everything following an attempt to traffic cocaine. A new docu-drama by Don Argott and Sheena M. Joyce, titled “Framing John DeLorean,” explores his life and tries to explain why a film about his life hadn't been made until today. 

ELENI MANDELL'S PRISON BLUES

Eleni Mandell is an L.A.-based singer-songwriter and educator. Her latest album, "Wake Up Again," was inspired by her work at a women’s prison in Southern California where she taught songwriting. The program she worked with is called Jail Guitar Doors.

YOUTUBE + HATE SPEECH

At the Code Conference this week, YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki apologized to the LGBTQ community in response to racist and homophobic attacks on the platform toward a Vox journalist, but she defended YouTube’s handling of the incident. Ina Fried, chief technology correspondent at Axios, spoke with John Horn about YouTube’s response and its role when dealing with hateful content.

SURF'S UP! (ON THE BIG SCREEN)

“Self-Discovery for Social Survival” is a collaborative surf film made by Pilgrim Surf + Supply and the record label Mexican Summer. It was filmed in three remote places — Mexico, the Maldives, and Iceland — and is accompanied by an original soundtrack, featuring music by Allah Las, Connan Mockasin, Andrew VanWyngarden of MGMT and more. Frame producer Jonathan Shifflett spoke with Mockasin, surf journalist Jamie Brisick and seven-time world champion surfer, Stephanie Gilmore. (“Self-Discovery” premieres June 15 at the Palace Theater in Los Angeles. The soundtrack is available now.)

STILL 'THE CITY,' BUT FOR WHOM?

The new film, "The Last Black Man in San Francisco," is loosely based on lead actor Jimmie Fails' own life story. Fails grew up living with his family in a Victorian home in San Francisco's historic Fillmore District. When Fails was six, he and his family were evicted. Many of his family members left the city, and Fails bounced around from one precarious living situation to another. For a time, he lived with his friend Joe Talbot, who would eventually direct and co-write "The Last Black Man in San Francisco." Fails and Talbot spoke with The Frame at the Sundance Film Festival about the inspiration for the film — a beautiful, surreal love letter to a city that sometimes doesn't seem to love you back.