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The Frame Weekend: Daisy Ridley; Alan Yang; 'Maiden' doc; queer music post Stonewall and more...




Daisy Ridley stars in
Daisy Ridley stars in "Ophelia."
IFC Films

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DAISY RIDLEY GOES FROM "STAR WARS" TO SHAKESPEARE

Daisy Ridley rose to fame almost overnight when she took on the legendary role of Rey in the latest "Star Wars" trilogy. With filming her final stint as Rey behind her, the classically-trained Ridley is looking for smaller, meaty roles to sink her teeth into. Her latest project, “Ophelia,” based on the Lisa Klein novel, is an alternate look at "Hamlet," with a dynamic, strong-willed Ophelia at the center. Ridley talks with John Horn about her empowered portrayal of the Shakespeare classic and establishing a career after "Star Wars."

WHAT'S THE FUTURE OF THE MOVIE THEATER?

Kyle Buchanan covers film and the film industry for the New York Times. He recently asked 24 major figures in Hollywood (including Ava DuVernay, Barry Jenkins and J.J. Abrams) what it will take for movies (and movie theaters) to survive in the next 10 years. He talks with The Frame about what he found and documented in his article How Will the Movies (as we know them) Survive the Next 10 Years?

"MAIDEN" DOCUMENTS A LEGENDARY VOYAGE

In the 1980’s, if you were a woman who wanted to be a competitive sailor– like Tracy Edwards did– you had only one option. To be a cook on a boat. So she organized her own boat with an all female crew. It was called Maiden and they entered the Whitbread Round the World Race. A new documentary called "Maiden" tells their story using footage that was shot on the boat during the nine month race over 33,000 miles. Edwards and the film's director, Alex Holmes, spoke with The Frame's John Horn about "Maiden."

THE MUSIC OF THE EARLY GAY LIBERATION MOVEMENT

Fifty years ago this week, patrons of the Stonewall Bar in New York City staged a six-day uprising against police harassment that galvanized a national movement and transformed “queer fear” into “gay power.” Along with it came some bold new queer music. The Frame’s Paul Ratliff shares the story of the musical voices that were nearly lost to history.

HIMESH PATEL CHANNELS THE BEATLES IN "YESTERDAY"

What if, by some miracle, The Beatles never existed and only you remembered their music. That’s the conceit behind the new film, “Yesterday,” directed by Danny Boyle. It stars Himesh Patel as Jack, an aspiring singer-songwriter who claims the music of the Fab Four as his own. Patel performed all the music for his first lead role in a major motion picture. When John Horn spoke with Patel, they talked about his audition process and took an impromptu quiz on The Beatles.

GETTING TO KNOW TONI MORRISON

The novelist Toni Morrison has won a Pulitzer Prize, a Nobel Prize for literature, and she was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Now, in the new documentary, "Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am," we learn about the woman behind the work to see how she got to this distinguished place in American culture. Directed by photographer and filmmaker Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, the movie premiered at the Sundance Film Festival last January. Film critic Beandrea July reviewed it for Out magazine at the time. Now that it’s in theaters, she takes another look at the film with the help of a leading expert on Morrison’s work, Farah Jasmine Griffin

ALAN YANG'S BIG PICTURE ON THE SMALL SCREEN

Alan Yang is a TV writer, producer and director known for "Parks and Recreation" and "Master of None." In the first of The Frame's series of conversations with prominent TV show-runners, Yang talks about how his mission in storytelling has changed, his recent series for Amazon, "Forever," and two upcoming projects — a film based on his family called "Tigertail," and his new series for the Apple streaming service, "Little America."