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Weekend: 'Sherman's Showcase' Creators; Patricia Arquette; The Bird and The Bee Sing Van Halen




The IFC series
The IFC series "Sherman's Showcase" was created by writers and comedians Diallo Riddle and Bashir Salahuddin.
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"This is a damn 'momedy', people!"

Patricia Arquette proudly and defiantly calls her new movie, “Otherhood," a momedy. It tells the story of three mothers in their 50s who set out to reconnect with their adult sons when they feel forgotten on Mother’s Day. In the process, they reconnect with their own passions for life and discover their identities beyond motherhood. Arquette, Chupack, and Schulman discuss how real-life biases against women over 50 were a real obstacle to greenlight a movie starring 50-something women. Patricia Arquette, writer/director Cindy Chupack and producer Cathy Schulman join The Frame to discuss how moms are portrayed on screen and how this film is different. ("Otherhood" is on Netflix now and in select theaters in New York and Los Angeles.) NOTE: Schulman addresses the subject of Felicity Huffman’s guilty plea in the college admissions scandal.

TARANTINO V. BRUCE LEE

The depiction of Bruce Lee– legendary action film star and martial artist– in Quentin Tarantino's "Once Upon A Time in Hollywood" has Lee's fans and family upset. Jen Yamato wrote about the controversy for the Los Angeles Times. She joins John Horn to break it all down.

GOING OFF THE 'SOUL TRAIN' RAILS

Is it music or comedy? A variety show or documentary? Writers and comedians Diallo Riddle and Bashir Salahuddin hope it’s clear that their new sketch comedy series, “Sherman’s Showcase,” is all these things. Riddle and Salahuddin talk about their desire to break out of comedy stereotypes, their years in the “graduate school of comedy” in late night TV, and how “Sherman’s Showcase” allowed them to merge their loves of music and laughs.

THE STORY BEHIND THE BAY AREA'S THRASH SCENE

The bands Metallica, Slayer and Megadeth are household names these days — bonafide Grammy Award-winning rock stars. Such acclaim seemed inconceivable in the early 1980’s when the bands were forging what came to be known as thrash metal. Radio and MTV steered clear. But the feral, punk rock-inspired sound of thrash got a foothold in Northern California and became the epicenter of this metallic revolution. A new documentary called, "Murder in the Front Row: The San Francisco Bay Area Thrash Metal Story," by longtime Metallica and Beastie Boys collaborator Adam Dubin, tells not only the story of the bands, but of the many fans who created the D-I-Y scene around them. The Frame contributor Steven Cuevas has the first-hand story. Yep, he was there.

A TIMELY DEBUT FOR 'THE INFILTRATORS'

Cristina Ibarra and Alex Rivera talk about their film, "The Infiltrators," which tells the true story of two young undocumented immigrants who embarked on a high-risk mission: go into America’s shadowy, for-profit, immigrant detention system, expose cases of abuse, and find a way to set people free. The film opensed the Los Angeles Latino Independent Film Festival and will be released in theaters later this year.

THE BIRD AND THE BEE COVER THEIR HEROES, VAN HALEN

Back in 2010, the duo The Bird and the Bee (Inara George and Greg Kurstin) released an album of Hall & Oates covers. They're back with Vol. 2 of their "Interpreting the Masters" series and this time they are paying tribute to ... Van Halen! That band's music is heavy on guitars and can objectify women. So what happens when a female singer covers the songs, without guitars? George and Kurstin recently visited our studio to chat with John Horn.