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Weekend: Nick Offerman; Trump as TV Character; Gay of Thrones and more...




Nick Offerman
Nick Offerman

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NICK OFFERMAN: COMEDIAN. CARPENTER. HEALER.

Nick Offerman talks with John Horn about his new live show, "All Rise." The actor, best known for the role of Ron Swanson on "Parks and Recreation," says he wants his act — part comedy, part music— to serve as a medicinal message for a divided country. ("All Rise" comes to the City National Grove of Anaheim on Oct. 13.)

THE CHARACTER-IN-CHIEF IN THE WHITE HOUSE

John talks with New York Times TV critic James Poniewozik about his new book, “Audience of One: Donald Trump, Television and the Fracturing of America”: "Try to understand Donald Trump as a person with psychology and strategy and motivation, and you will inevitably spiral into confusion and covfefe. The key is to remember that Donald Trump is not a person. He’s a TV character."

ON SET WITH 'GAY OF THRONES'

Jonathan Van Ness and Erin Gibson, executive producers of the Funny or Die web series
Jonathan Van Ness and Erin Gibson, executive producers of the Funny or Die web series "Gay of Thrones." Gibson created the series and directs all the episodes and Van Ness stars in the series.
Funny or Die

The Funny or Die webseries "Gay of Thrones" was co-created by  Jonathan Van Ness ("Queer Eye") and Erin Gibson during season three of "Game of Thrones." Both had their final seasons this year. Now "Gay of Thrones" is in the running for a Creative Arts Emmy in the Short Form Variety category. The Frame visited the set of the recap show which involves Jonathan and a celebrity guest dishing about GOT using rapid-fire pop culture references while doing a fake haircut (Jonathan is a hairdresser by trade and it's how he and Gibson met).  

"THE HANDMAIDS TALE" PROTEST UNIFORM

Margaret Atwood just released “The Testaments” – a sequel to her 1985 novel, “The Handmaid’s Tale,” But the fictional world imagined by Atwood now exists in three dimensions thanks to the Hulu-series-adaptation. The first three seasons are all available for streaming, and it’s been renewed for the fourth.  We also see version of the red cape with white worn in real life political demonstrations. The Frame’s Julia Paskin talked with Natalie Brondfman, the show’s designer about her contribution to the costume look turned protest-uniform.

LA SANTA CECILIA PLAYS EL PASO

The new album titled "La Santa Cecilia" is simply named after the L.A.-based Grammy-winning quartet. The new release continues the group's genre-defying sound, bringing together elements of rock, soul, Mexican folk music and even a bit of New Orleans jazz. John Horn spoke with singer Marisoul Hernandez and percussionist Miguel "Oso" Ramirez. They recently performed at a concert in El Paso organized after the mass shooting last month. (La Santa Cecilia performs Oct. 12 at The Soraya theater at Cal State Northridge.)

"THIS CLOSE": A SHOW THAT DEMANDS CLOSE LISTENING 

“This Close” is a dramedy on the Sundance Channel about two best friends navigating love and life in Los Angeles. On its face, that may sound like a familiar — even generic — plot. But the show is the first of its kind: a series starring, created and written by deaf people. Josh Feldman and Shoshannah Stern are the creators and leads of "This Close" and The Frame contributor Ari Saperstein has their story.