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Weekend: Robert Pattinson; HBO's 'Watchmen'; 'Jojo Rabbit' Dir. Taika Waititi; Morrissey's politics and more




Robert Pattinson and Willem Dafoe star in
Robert Pattinson and Willem Dafoe star in "The Lighthouse."
(A24 Films)

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ROBERT PATTINSON GETS DARK IN "THE LIGHTHOUSE" 

In the black-and-white thriller, “The Lighthouse,” Pattinson plays a lighthouse keeper with a dark past. It’s just one in a line of eclectic roles he’s taken after his star-making turns in the “Twilight” franchise. Pattinson talks about creating his character through a unique accent, what he looks for in his roles, and what he enjoys about acting.  

HBO'S "WATCHMEN" INCLUDES REAL-LIFE TULSA RACE MASSACRE

"Watchmen" is based on a graphic novel set in New York in the 1980s. Only the  HBO series is set in Tulsa Oklahoma, first in 1921 and then in 2019. The Undefeated culture critic, Soraya Nadia McDonald breaks down how the first episode grounds the fictional show in very real history. 

TAIKI WAITITI "JOJO Rabbit" HAS AUDIENCES EITHER JUMPING FOR JOY OR HOPPING MAD 

John Horn talks with Taika Waititi, director of "Thor: Ragnarok" and writer of the comedy, "What We Do in the Shadows," about his latest film, "JOJO Rabbit." The movie is billed as an anti-hate satire and follows the story of a young boy in WWII-era Germany who has an unusual imaginary friend: Adolf Hitler. Waititi says the story of the war is worth re-telling again and again, and he hopes his satire will bring it to a new generation of viewers. 

ARE MORRISSEY'S POLITICAL LEANINGS ALIENATING HIS FANS? 

For music fans in the 1980s and '90s, the sound of The Smiths was inescapable. It spoke to the outsiders, the loners and the oppressed. The popularity of the band's lead singer, Morrissey, really took off in the U.S. as a solo artist, especially among Mexican-Americans in Southern California. And Morrissey returned the affection in songs such as “Mexico” and “First of the Gang to Die.” He even settled in L.A. for about a decade. But now those fans, including The Frame contributor Steven Cuevas, are having to confront an uncomfortable truth about the singer, and whether or not to attend his upcoming Hollywood Bowl show.

JUST IN TIME FOR HALLOWEEN: REBOOTING A HORROR CLASSIC

John Horn talks with director Roxanne Benjamin about her work on Shudder's new anthology series, "Creepshow." The show is a re-imagining of the classic 1982 horror movie of the same name and features short form segments written by Stephen King and others. Benjamin talks about working with practical effects master Greg Nicotero ("The Walking Dead") for the show and why she thinks horror is undervalued as a genre.

AGAINST POWERFUL FORCES, "THE CURRENT WAR" GETS A RELEASE

Director Alfonso Gómez-Rejón’s latest film, “The Current War,” was supposed to be a major step for the filmmaker. It has an all-star cast, including Benedict Cumberbatch, Michael Shannon and Tom Holland. With a screenplay that follows the true story of the electric current battle that embroiled Nikola Tesla, Thomas Edison and George Westinghouse, the movie seemed like Academy Award fodder. There was a major problem for “The Current War,” though: its attachment to Harvey Weinstein. Two years after an ill-advised screening of a rough cut at the Toronto International Film Festival, followed by The Weinstein Company filing for bankruptcy, the film is finally being released as “The Current War: Director’s Cut.” Gómez-Rejón tells John Horn why he took up the late-19th Century War of Currents as a subject after his 2015 Sundance hit, “Me and Earl and the Dying Girl.” 

EVERCLEAR FRONTMAN SINGS OF LIVING WITH M.S.

One of the punk-pop stars of the ’90s is back with a solo album. Art Alexakis, the frontman of Everclear, has a lot of heavy things on his mind: white supremacists, cyberbullies, and living with a scary disease. But as he explained to The Frame contributor Tim Greiving, this might be his sunniest album yet.