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Alma Har'el Is Keeper Of The 'Honey Boy' Hive




Director Alma Har'el (R) on the set of
Director Alma Har'el (R) on the set of "Honey Boy."

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On today's show:

A Bittersweet Story

(Starts at 7:45)

The movie "Honey Boy" is a first for both director Alma Har'el and actor/writer Shia LaBeouf. The film, which is based on LaBeouf's tumultuous relationship with his father, is Har'el's narrative feature debut and LaBeouf's first feature-length screenplay. But the two have a history that goes pretty far back. LaBeouf first reached out to Har'el after seeing her boundary-breaking 2011 documentary, "Bombay Beach." He then starred in a music video that Har'el wrote and directed for the Icelandic rock band Sigur Rós that touched on themes of addiction and abuse, and he later executive produced her second documentary, "LoveTrue." When LaBeouf began writing the script for "Honey Boy" during a court-mandated rehab stay in 2017 and sent it to Har'el, she says she was certain she wanted to direct it. Har'el was recently given the Director's Guild Award for First Time Feature Film and she's a directing nominee at the Independent Spirit Awards. Har'el spoke with John Horn about what drew her to "Honey Boy."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5RR8WTQzwSk

AFRICAN AMERICAN FILM EPHEMERA FINDS A HOME

(Starts at :45)

The Lucas Museum has acquired Separate Cinema — believed to be the most prominent collection of ephemera related to African American film history in the world. This archive of more than 37,000 rare items includes original film posters, publicity materials and film stills featuring the work of Oscar Micheaux, Josephine Baker, Paul Robeson, Dorothy Dandridge, Sidney Poitier and others. John talks with the Lucas Museum's film curator, Ryan Linkof.