Movies, music, TV, arts and entertainment, straight from Southern California.
Hosted by John Horn
Airs Temporarily on hiatus so that our staff can help out our colleagues in the KPCC newsroom and on our other shows.

Weekend: Robbie Robertson remembers; Kerry Washington makes a doc; Alfred Molina on stage...




Robbie Robertson with The Frame's John Horn at the musician's studio.
Robbie Robertson with The Frame's John Horn at the musician's studio.
KPCC

Listen to story

51:03
Download this story 49MB

ROBBIE ROBERTSON REMEMBERS

Robbie Robertson is best known as the guitarist of The Band and songwriter of many songs, including “The Weight.” He met with John Horn at his recording studio to discuss the new documentary about his life with The Band, called “Once Were Brothers.”

"Once Were Brothers" is in theaters now.

KERRY WASHINGTON PRODUCES DOC ABOUT ACLU LAWYERS

Last month, the Sundance Film Festival debuted a documentary produced by Kerry Washington called “The Fight.” It tells the story of several ACLU lawyers who have challenged the Trump Administration on family separation, abortion access, the trans military ban, and the 2020 census. “The Fight” is directed by Eli Despres, Elyse Steinberg and Josh Kriegman, who made the 2016 documentary, “Weiner,” about disgraced former Congressman Anthony Weiner. At Sundance, John spoke with Despres, Washington, and Dale Ho — director of the ACLU’s Voting Rights Project.

"The Fight" will be out later this year.

ALFRED MOLINA GRAPPLES WITH DEMENTIA ON STAGE

In the play, “The Father,” Alfred Molina plays a man lost in time and place. Furniture appears to rearrange itself. People looks drastically different from one moment to the next. And time is moving, but not in a straight line. Molina's character has Alzheimer’s disease — an illness very close to his own family. But Molina isn’t entirely alone on his character’s journey. “The Father” is written in a way that brings the audience inside his confusion and vulnerability. He spoke with John Horn at The Frame's studio. 

"The Father" is on stage at the Pasadena Playhouse through March 1.

CANDIDATES COME TO HOLLYWOOD 

Democratic candidates and President Trump have made trips to Los Angeles this week. As Super Tuesday approaches, Californians have more say. John Horn takes the pulse on who in Hollywood is backing which candidate for the White House. He talks with Ted Johnson from Deadline.

PRESERVING VINYL

Last year it was revealed that a 2008 fire on the Universal Studios lot destroyed thousands of music recordings. Original masters by Elton John, Billie Holiday, Judy Garland — gone forever. Fortunately, there are record labels devoted to preserving, remastering and releasing old recordings. The Frame contributor Tim Greiving visited one of them to find out how it’s done, and just what is lost when a tape goes up in flames.

THE STORY OF "McMILLIONS"

The chances of winning any kind of million-dollar prize is pretty minuscule, but it's something different when the game is rigged from the start. And when a mobster and former police officer are at the center of the con, that's something stranger than fiction. If you ever played the McDonald's Monopoly game in the '90s in the hopes of winning a cool million, you might be surprised to know there were almost no legitimate winners of the advertised "high value" prizes from 1989 to 2001. The new HBO docu-series, "McMillions," examines how the con was pulled off without the McDonald's Corporation's knowledge, how the FBI ultimately uncovered it, and the unexpected collateral damage. John Horn spoke with James Lee Hernandez and Brian Lazarte, the co-writers and co-directors of the series.

DANCE MUSIC WITH A MESSAGE

The LA post-punk band French Vanilla makes dance music with a message. With songs titles like “Bromosapian,” it’s clear the band has a sharp sense of humor. But the underlying themes of queer identity and gender bias couldn’t feel more urgent. The Frame contributor Allison Wolfe spoke with bandmates Sally Spitz, Daniel Trautfield and Ali Day about their most recent album, "How Am I Not Myself?"