Drought |

Future of Water: Which species could we lose by 2040?

Jed Kim
| As California cities and farms squabble over water, conservationists are having to make tough choices about where to direct what water they have, in some cases weighing the fate of entire species.

Future of Water: A trip to the water-wise LA of 2040

|

In the L.A. of 25 years hence, look for "atomizing" shower heads, "smart" water meters, and homes that drink in rain water like a sponge. Don't forget the water-friendly tacos.

Slideshow

Future of Water: Technology to help Calif. farms stretch every drop

|

High-tech drip irrigation is taking hold on California farms. But there's a paradox: the more water that technology saves, the more incentive farmers have to plant more crops.

Slideshow

Burbank offering free recycled water to residents

|

Burbank is mandated by the state to conserve 24 percent more water compared to what they used in 2013, which comes out to about 1 billion gallons.

Document

When the wells run dry: California neighbors cope in drought

|

In Okieville, located in a dry corner of California's Central Valley, wells have gone dry for many of the 100 modest homes, leaving residents to live in "Third-World-type conditions."

Slideshow

California Drought Relief Fund to raise money for drought, fire support

|

The campaign will run through the end of September and has $250,000 goal to reach by that time. The money will go to local groups working on these issues.

Rural areas, fish and birds in danger if drought persists

|

A study from the Public Policy Institute of California found that if the drought lasts another three years, rural communities, wildlife and forests will suffer most.

California agriculture industry growing despite drought

|

The lead author of a study on the drought's economic impact on California says the state is faring "much better than many had predicted.” How is that possible?